Jakarta: Photos from around

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Night traffic in Jakarta

Jakarta is a sprawling megacity, with 10 million people crammed into an area smaller than New York City. The people here come from a kaleidoscope of cultures and faiths; dozens of Indonesian ethnic groups rub elbows and the majority Muslim community lives alongside communities of Buddhists, Christians, Catholics, and Hindus. It’s business as usual for the thousand year-old seaport, which has seen waves of nearly all the world’s religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Islam, and Christianity) carried on the tides of trade routes.

Indonesia’s wealth has increased in the past decade, but with it has come rising income inequality that is etched into Jakarta’s cityscape. We’re staying in Glodok, an industrial area near the seaport characterized by corrugated aluminum roofing, wooden market stalls, and open sewers in the streets. But take a bus thirty minutes south and you’ll find yourself in Central Jakarta neighborhoods like Menteng, surrounded by walled mansions and multi-story malls with marble floors pushing the latest luxury brands, where doors are opened for you by bellhops who speak perfectly unaccented English. The economic disparity in the city is jarring—residents of Glodok and Menteng may share a city, but they live in different worlds.

In spite of the wealth gap, nearly everyone we meet in Jakarta is happy to see us. Any smile from us is immediately returned by a passing person. On the bus and around town, people who speak English ask us about our travels and translate our responses for excited relatives. Gaggles of schoolchildren approach you at tourist attractions, tasked by their teachers to interview tourists as English homework, and in nervous giggles ask about your favorite Indonesian food. I’ve never felt more welcome in a country where I don’t speak the language. It’s as if the entire country is excitedly curious about you, reaching out to embrace you in every act.

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Jakarta rush hour seen from Glodok, where five rows of cars fit into four lanes and sometimes the motorbikes skip traffic via the bus lane (right).

 

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The square in front of the Jakarta History Museum in Kota Tua.

 

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Stoytcho tries a hot bowl of wedang ronde, a local sweet snack.

 

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A variety of dishes offered at a padang stall in the Blok M food market.

 

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People watch rainy-day traffic in front of the Istiqlal Mosque, the largest mosque in Southeast Asia. Across the street is the Jakarta Cathedral; both houses of worship have coexisted on this street for decades.

 

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Two girls, one with a headscarf, walk together in front of the Jakarta History Museum in Kota Tua.

 

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A puppet made for Wayang, the traditional Indonesian shadow puppet theater.

 

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A nasi goreng (fried rice) stall on the street.

 

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The narrow, makeshift market-crammed streets of Chinatown, near Glodok.

 

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Pipes empty into a streetside open sewer in Glodok.

 

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A fountain in the Grand Indonesia Mall.

 

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The National Monument (Monas), commemorating the country’s fight for independence.

 

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A woman and her child in an ojek (motorbike) parking lot.

 

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We take a selfie with Indonesian students that interviewed us for their English class.

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